Glossary

  • Antimicrobial activity: The effectiveness with which a sanitizer or disinfectant can kill microorganisms.
  • Corrosive: Elements, in this case chemical, that has the power to weaken or eat away at equipment, especially metal.
  • Disinfection: The act of adding or applying a sanitizer in order to kill microorganisms that may cause decay in produce or illness in humans.
  • Disinfection hurdle: A descriptive concept term that symbolizes the minimum effective exposure to achieve microbial kill. Disinfection is one of several hurdles in a prevention, reduction, and contamination control program. The “disinfection hurdle” will be different for different types or classes of microorganisms.
  • Pathogens: Microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses that can cause disease in humans or plants.
  • Peak chlorine demand: The time in a batch of water when material, inorganic and organic, will “use up” the maximum amount chlorine that has been added. After the peak chlorine demand is known, it can be better established how much more chlorine or more clean water should be added to maintain target disinfectant concentrations. Additional steps, such as minimizing adhering soil, a pre-wash, or filtration may be necessary to reduce the chlorine demand .
  • Potable water: Water that is clean enough to be considered drinkable.
  • ppm: Parts per million.
  • Product sensory: Characteristics of a product, in this case fresh produce, related to smell, taste, appearance and texture.
  • Reactive: A chemical that is especially reactive is one that doesn’t stay in one form for very long. In the case of chlorine, it is important that chlorine stay in a particular form in order to be effective, so the reactivity of chlorine is of particular interest.
  • Sanitizer: A chemical that is added or applied, in this case to water, in order to kill pathogens. A surface or water may be sanitized, free of pathogens, but not sterile, free of microorganisms.
  • Sensitivity: A system or test’s sensitivity refers to the lowest concentration that the system can detect or respond to. For example, if a chlorine test system can only detect concentrations of chlorine at or higher than 1 ppm, the system’s senstivity is said to be at 1 ppm.